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Surviving the Second CNN Revolution

On a recent post I commented about CNN’s updated news crawl being a shill for their Twitter and other online efforts. Turns out, I was more right than I knew. Not only were they in the midst of a heated competition with their worthy opponent Ashton Kutcher to see who could reach a million followers first, but they were simultaneously reeling from the news that they were now, for the first time in their existence, ranked THIRD in viewership behind Fox and MSNBC!

Ashton beat them to the mil, but as Rick Sanchez so magnanimously said, “If you counted everything we do on Twitter we really beat him, but it’s all good.” or something empowering like that.

Normally I’d ignore his good sportsmanship except that I also read an article in Variety that said nearly the same thing. CNN spun their 3rd place finish in prime time into an ad for their multi-channel capability:

“Primetime is most meaningful to entertainment networks,” says CNN U.S. prexy Jonathan Klein, noting that his channel sells its commercial time in a more bundled, multiplatform way that differs from most cable networks, which deal more in the typical currency of primetime ratings points.

And that’s why, no doubt, during the middle of the day the other Friday, they actually showed Ed Henry interviewing somebody on CNN-Radio on CNN cable TV. There he was, boom mike dangling in front of his face, CNN Radio sign strategically positioned, except he was on the TV.

Multi-Channel is as multi-channel does. So CNN aims for the Twitter stratosphere,  creates partnerships with Facebook, takes on Talk Radio (“We’ll fight them on the fields, we’ll fight them on the shores, we’ll fight them in the air!”).

Or, to quote a more controversial character than old Mr. Churchill, “Get ther the fustest with the mustest.” (Be the first to guess who said that one and I’ll send you a Claxton Fruit Cake!)

We are watching CNN, the people who transformed television news by replacing the tyrannical scheduled reporting cycle (anybody remember the 6:00 News?) with getting their cameras wherever news was happening as it was happening (and using local network reporters when they didn’t have one of their own in place) transform news again. This time, they’re replacing the tyranny of platform exclusivity with the freedom of device. Klein continues:

“We sell against all of our platforms — TV, online, international — and it’s hard to say there’s one particular daypart or hour of the day that matters more,” says Klein… Our competition doesn’t have the resources to cover the news the way we do. They’ve actually ceded news coverage to us.”

Convergence doesn’t just happen. CNN is using their core platforms to advertise and drive their customers to their other platforms including Time Magazine. It’s a massive multi-channel marketing effort, it’s intrusive, and apparently, it’s working:  Follow us on Twitter — over a million Twitterers can’t be wrong!.

Recognizing, as CNN’s John King said, that they are “in the word business”, CNN is stuffing those words wherever they can … and monetizing their words along the way. Newspapers should take note:  you’re all in the “word biz” — not the dead tree biz or the radio wave business or the cathode ray business or the pixel business.

Of the last twenty or so articles I read from the NY Times, none of them were on newspaper, and I found them via Digg, Google News, and in emails from friends. The last radio program I listened to was on my computer. The last time I got a story from CNN I read it on my phone.

CNN won the first digital news revolution. They overthrew the powers that be and changed everything. Now that they’re the underdogs again, it looks like they’re sticking it to the man one more time — only this time, the man is Rupert Murdoch.

So, with CNN working hard to become the multi-channel newsroom of the next great era in journalism, with all their vaunted commitment to new media and the instant-dissemniation nature of Twitter, can someone please explain to me why in the last 24 hours, CNNBRK, their twitter account with 1,339,599 followers, had only two breaking news stories?

By jlsimons

I'm a matchmaker and a storyteller, and while most people look at their business from within a silo I look at it from 20,000 feet up and see connections - or things that should be connected - that others miss. These days, I've focused on Social Media, and I get to work with people like Neil deGrasse Tyson and Josef Katz. In the past, I've put Spider-Man in a cereal box and the X-Men in a can of Pasta. In over a decade at Tanen Directed Advertising, I helped MasterCard do their first mailing in Taiwan and Citigroup grab a bigger share of the world than they had before. At Q.E.D. Games, we created critically acclaimed historical card games and revolutionized roleplaying games by getting rid of the dice. At Marvel, I created advergames before they were called that. I upset applecarts, color outside the lines and believe that rulebooks are for the people who come in second. My current goal is to find 3 more hours in the day and be first in line for a jack into the back of my brain. Oh, and to find a publisher for my teen cyberpunk science fiction novel, Spirit in Realtime.

Specialties: Promotional partnerships, integrated marketing, social media, strategic marketing, alternate channels, direct response, corporate marketing, copywriting, advergaming, game design and development, financial advertising

4 replies on “Surviving the Second CNN Revolution”

Guess I’m hopelessly old fashioned. Who needs a minute-by-minute breakdown of how people are wasting their time, their lives and their energies? How about just living, doing, accomplishing? Without millions looking on?

And word monopolies disturb me. I must have been asleep when the rules changed about owning more than one type of news medium? Enlighten me, please, as I’m obviously also hopelessly naive.

F.R.

You raise an interesting point, FR, about news monopolies. I do think there were limits about ownership, but I don’t know the rules, or if they’ve changed. I think that fewer news outlets in each market is fast becoming the reality in many parts of the country, which makes the multi-channel national news orgs even more powerful. If your city or town loses its paper, as is happening more and more frequently in bigger and bigger cities, you have no choice but to turn to Cable news, or the Times, Wall St. Journal or… gag… USA Today.

Git thar the fustest with the mostest men.

Nathan Bedford Forrest

(There are those who insisted he made the comment with correct usage. Others claim the whole thing is an urban legend.)

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